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ASU 'Happy' With Final State Budget PDF Print
Written by Steve Frank   
Tuesday, 29 June 2010 06:20

It should be hard to call millions of dollars in cuts a victory, but that’s just what UNC officials are doing, after the long process of hammering out a state budget.   With the state reeling from the worst recession maybe in US history, budget proposals ran from over $150 million in cuts to a third of that.  Now, with the final $19 billion document ready to hit Governor Perdue’s desk, there is some relief from ASU officials over their budget.  Dr. Susan McCracken, Director of External affairs and taking point in ASU’s interest in the budget process, says that all-in-all, the university weathered the worst.  “One was the flexibility management cut which basically was how much money would be removed from the entire university system.  The House of Representatives had requested that cut to be as large as $150 million, 100 million in the Governor’s budget, and  $50 million in the Senate budget—we came out at $70 million overall. So that will be—it will be an additional cut for Appalachian but it will be far less than what we originally anticipated.”  McCracken said UNC officials were happy with the $34 million for needs-based aid, as over 70% of students fall into the ‘needs-based’ category, and the $34 million fully funds that.  And money is in the budget to open and maintain new buildings, important to Appalachian with the new Education Department facility to open during this budget.  But there are dark clouds still ahead, as McCracken says revenue projections for next year’s budget are even more dismal than the current year, and without a turn-around in the economy, even more budget woes could come.  The bill is expected to be voted on today and Wednesday before going to Perdue's desk. If signed into law before the new fiscal year begins Thursday, it would mark the first time in seven years that a budget was approved on time.

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